Drug Interactions With Rifampin

More Detail on Drug Interactions With Rifampin

The following sections explain in detail the potentially negative reactions that can occur when any of the drugs mentioned above are combined with rifampin.
 
Antacids
Antacids may decrease the amount of rifampin that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract into the bloodstream. To reduce the risk for this interaction, you should take your rifampin dose at least one hour before taking an antacid.
 
Antifungal Medications
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of certain antifungal medications, potentially making the medicines less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust the dose of your antifungal medication.  
 
Atovaquone
Combining atovaquone with rifampin may decrease blood levels of atovaquone, possibly making it less effective. The combination may also increase blood levels of rifampin, increasing the possibility for side effects.
 
Barbiturates
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of barbiturates, potentially making the drugs less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dose of your barbiturate, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin.
 
Certain Anti-Seizure Medications
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of certain medications used to treat seizures, which could make the medicines less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dose of your anti-seizure medicine, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin.
 
Certain Class I Arrhythmia Medications
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of certain arrhythmia medications, possibly making the drugs less effective. Your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dose of your arrhythmia medicine if you take it with rifampin. 
 
Certain Diabetes Medicines
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of certain medications used to treat diabetes, which could make the medicines less effective. If you take a medication for diabetes, your healthcare provider may need to adjust your dosage, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin.
 
Certain Protease Inhibitors
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of protease inhibitors, potentially making the drugs less effective. In addition, people who are given rifampin in combination with saquinavir and ritonavir may have a higher risk for developing liver problems. These medications should not be taken together. 
 
Ciprofloxacin
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of ciprofloxacin, possibly making it less effective. Your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your ciprofloxacin dosage if you take it with rifampin.
 
Clarithromycin
Rifampin may decrease clarithromycin blood levels, which could make the medicine less effective. Your healthcare provider may need to adjust your clarithromycin dosage if you take these medicines together.
 
Corticosteroids
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of corticosteroids, which could make the drugs less effective. Your healthcare provider may need to adjust your corticosteroid dosage if you take it with rifampin.
 
Cyclosporine
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of cyclosporine, potentially making the medicines less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your cyclosporine dosage.  
 
Dapsone
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of dapsone, potentially making the medicines less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust the dosage of dapsone you are taking.  
 
Diazepam
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of diazepam, potentially making it less effective. If you take diazepam, your healthcare provider may need to adjust your dosage during rifampin treatment.
 
Digoxin
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of digoxin, potentially decreasing its effectiveness. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may need to adjust your digoxin dosage, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin.
 
Enalapril
Rifampin may decrease the effectiveness of enalapril. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to monitor your blood pressure more closely, and adjust your enalapril dose if needed.
 
Haloperidol
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of haloperidol, possibly making it less effective. Your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your haloperidol dosage if you take it with rifampin.
 
Hormonal Contraceptives
Rifampin can decrease the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, such as birth control pills or patches. It is recommended that nonhormonal methods of birth control be used during rifampin treatment. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best birth control method for your particular situation.
 
Ketoconazole
Combining ketoconazole and rifampin may decrease blood levels of both medicines, possibly decreasing their effectiveness. If you take these drugs together, your healthcare provider may choose to monitor you more closely to make sure the medicines are working for you.
 
Levothyroxine
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of levothyroxine, which could make the medicines less effective. If you take levothyroxine, your healthcare provider may need to adjust your dosage, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin.
 
Narcotic Pain Medicines
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of narcotic pain medicines, potentially making the drugs less effective. If you take a narcotic pain medication, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your dosage during rifampin treatment.
 
Probenecid
Probenecid may increase blood levels of rifampin, potentially increasing the chance for rifampin side effects. Your healthcare provider may choose to monitor you more closely if you take these medicines together.
 
Quinine
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of quinine, possibly making it less effective. If you take quinine, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your dosage during rifampin treatment.
 
Some Blood Pressure Medicines
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of beta blockers and calcium channel blockers, which could decrease their effectiveness. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dose of your blood pressure medicines, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin. 
 
Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim
Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim may increase blood levels of rifampin, potentially increasing the risk of rifampin side effects. Your healthcare provider may choose to monitor you more closely if you take these medicines together.
 
Tacrolimus
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of tacrolimus, potentially making the medicine less effective. Your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your tacrolimus dosage if you take these medicines together.
 
Theophylline
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of theophylline, potentially making the medicine less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your theophylline dosage.  
 
Tricyclic Antidepressants
Rifampin can decrease blood levels of tricyclic antidepressants, which could decrease their effectiveness. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may need to adjust the dose of your tricyclic antidepressant, especially when you first start or stop taking rifampin. 
 
Warfarin
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of warfarin, potentially making the drug less effective. If you take these medicines together, your healthcare provider may choose to frequently monitor your international normalized ratio (INR), and adjust your warfarin dose as needed.
 
Zidovudine
Rifampin may decrease blood levels of zidovudine, potentially making the medicine less effective. Your healthcare provider may choose to adjust your zidovudine dosage if you take it with rifampin. 
 

Rifampin Antibiotic Information

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